Dear Problem Ladies,
My beloved local yarn store just went out of business. No more knitting night, no more on-the-spot helpful advice about Japanese knitting chart mystery symbols, no more emergency runs for the other kind of pastel plastic stitch markers or the last skein of the dye lot, no more lovely new yarns to contemplate (and fondle) at my leisure. What should I do?

Unrelated: I recently noticed an accumulation of greenish paper stuff in my pockets. What’s up with that?

Suddenly Flush in Katonah
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Dear Problem Ladies,
A woman I work with was taught the very basics of knitting by her grandmother at the age of seven. More than 50 years later, my friend only knits basic scarves and afghans and has yet to discover superwash wool, cashmere laceweight, hand-dyed sock yarn, Noro, Ravelry, KALs, Friday-night knitting groups, and all the other joys of modern knitting. I have two questions. 1. How do I gently introduce her to knitting in the 21st century without overwhelming her? 2. She has no stash! This is a serious problem that must be corrected! Can you give me some suggestions for selecting parts of my stash to give her so that she can have her own yarn collection?

Anne
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Dear Problem Ladies,
I’ve been working on a Fair Isle cardigan for a while. The colors are lovely, the pattern isn’t too hard, and the steeking was fun. So what is the problem? Well, I had the sinking feeling while working on the yoke that it was getting smaller. “That’s just the shaping and you’ll be cutting it open so you’ll be fine,” I kept telling myself.

We all know where this is going. It is too small now on the top. I’m going to finish it anyway because I’m sure I have a tiny friend somewhere who will love it. But for next time, what is a good way to keep things from getting super small when you are doing Fair Isle? Pulling at the floats? Going up a bit in needle, just knitting a size bigger? Any advice would be great.

Ikisti
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