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Twist Collective Blog

Inglenook

Laura Kanemori


Laura Kanemori is the designer of these wonderful socks, Inglenook, which feature both a lovely lace motif and non-traditional shaping. Today, Laura shares with us her design process for this, her first pattern with Twist Collective. This entry is cross-posted from her blog, which can be found here.




Heel and gusset detail


I love socks. After my first few inevitable scarf and hat projects, socks were the next thing on my "must learn to knit" list. And a 2009 sock club was an extra-special treat from my husband.

After working my way through that club, I moved on to Cat Bordhi's New Pathways for Sock Knitters. I love this book. After walking through the very basic steps of sock construction through others' patterns, this book lets you leap off into the deep end of your own ideas.


Prototype closeup

Iin comes Inglenook. Cat teaches that gusset increases can go just about anywhere they want to go, and I know that lace is made up of paired increases and decreases. So I wondered what would happen if you left out the decreases; what you get is a pattern that grows on its own in a very natural manner.  A sock that grows without an obvious gusset!

Inglenook grew from one of my favorite lace patterns. Each motif reminds me of the licking tongue of a flame. These flamelets grow down your leg from a spiky picot edge and then turn under the heel in a cushy slip-stitch reinforced sole. The socks are wonderfully comfortable in open-back clogs.

Toes were something else that came to mind when I was knitting from other people's patterns. Knitted fabric is wonderful in that it stretches and conforms. If you give it a shape reasonably close to what you want it to be, it will accommodate small differences. But you can also shape it exactly as you want.

Traditional toes decrease equally on the left and right side. But if you look at your foot, the big toe extends straight out from the body of the foot. I shaped this sock's toe to fit the line of the foot more naturally, and this technique not much different than working a more standard wedge-shaped toe.

Then, we have the yarn...

Side view

While I tried these out first with yarn I had in my own stash, I had the opportunity to knit with some really lovely yarn, KnitGlobal Pollika sock yarn. This 4-ply yarn is fantastic for socks. It is a wool/nylon blend with a really firm twist. The four plies make the stitches just pop (I'd imagine it would also knit into some really amazing cables and twisted-stitch patterns) and it has a lovely, deep color. It knits up into a smooth fabric that I couldn't wait to put on my own feet (and did quite a few times before giving these babies their final careful wash and block to send them off). It's a real treat to knit with.

All in all, Inglenook takes a whole bunch of individual design elements I really like and combines them into a cohesive whole, and in them my toes are just as toasty and warm as they would be if tucked up close to the flames dancing in my fireplace.

The pattern for Inglenook is available from the Twist Collective in the Winter 2011 issue.