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Twist Collective Blog

Where do you Twist?

Fiona EllisFiona Ellis is a regular contributor to Twist Collective.This issue, she designed the lovely Paisley, and authored the companion article about the fascinating history of paisley. Today, she shares her tips for knitting on the road, something she does a lot of! All of us at Twist are also inviting you to share your knitting adventures and travel tales with us.




have Twist tote, will travel


One of the aspects of my work is that I get to travel quite a lot, but this spring I have been accompanying my husband while he is on a cross North America extravaganza with his company. As this is mostly a driving tour I have had gobs of time to knit. I have several projects on the go, including a new design for the fall issue of Twist, so I have not been at all bored spending these long hours in the car.

There are logistics to be considered to be able to work on the road like this though. Shipping yarn to hotels has not been a problem thanks to excellent courier services. The wide availability of the Internet means I can work remotely just as I usually do. Five to seven un-interrupted hours to knit means I can get several inches done -- but also requires that I have already precisely figured out the pattern and shaping. Roadside stops to eat and answer the call of nature provide me with the opportunity to check my work, measure the piece and grab more yarn from the trunk.

From many previous trips on planes I already have a small project grab bag that contains my essential tools, including a small package of dental floss, which has multiple applications: it can be used for life-lines, as a stitch holder and also has an airplane friendly cutter. My knitting bag of choice has been the Twist Tote; boy does that thing hold a lot of yarn! I love the outer pockets for bottles of water and snacks (note from the bloglady- these totes are not currently available- but we have lots of cute lil Twist tape measures. They come in handy, whatever sort of bag you carry your projects in).

I thought I would share with you the most spectacular spot that I have taken it to so far: Hoosier Pass in Colorado. On the Continental Divide and an elevation of 11,539 feet, I think this is the highest I have been on knitting, excluding on an airplane of course.


Fiona and her knitting at the Hoosier Pass


The knitting peeking out is the new project for the fall issue and you can’t quite see it here but I am working on a pair of 4mm Signature Needles.

So the question for you is: Where in the world do you Twist? Whether it's your own backyard or a place you travelled to, we want to know where you take your Twist projects, and where they take you!

Tweet your photos of your latest projects (and/or totes and tape measures) out in the world @twistcollective, or post them on our Facebook page. Happy knitting, and happy travelling!

Design Process: Caeles

Hilary Smith CallisToday's post comes to us from Hilary Smith Callis, designer of Caeles, a fitted summertime sweater with a beautiful scoop neck and detailed collar. She shares how this design went from idea to final product! You can also find this post (and much more) on her blog.

 

 

 

The idea for Caeles started, as many of my knits do, when I saw something pretty at Anthropologie. The item in question, I believe, was a slouchy jersey tank top with a knitted collar. I say "I believe" because I don't have a photo of it and, as many of my knits go, once the design seed is planted by the pretty thing at Anthropologie, it starts to take on a life of its own. Because after thinking it might be fun to try and knit a collar onto a tank top, I started thinking about how a similar collar would look on a knitted something, what shape that something would have, how it would fit, and suddenly I had a new summer top.

Here's my original sketch (this is kind of embarrassing -- my sketches and handwriting are awful):

 

Sketch

 

Unlike the Anthro tank top, I wanted my top to be fitted through the waist and flare at the hips, which I thought would be nicely executed with body darts. Because my sketches are so much better in yarn, I didn't think about adding little sleeves until the prototype was finished.

 

Prototype Collar

 

I thought the collar had a little bit of a retro-modern, Judy Jetson-ish vibe and that the top could use one more dose of that quality. (By the way, that's where the name 'caeles' came from. It's Latin for 'heavenly' or 'celestial' and comes from the word for 'sky' -- I picked it to reflect the original space-y feel of those sleeves and collar.)

 

Prototype

 

The prototype (modeled above with completely the wrong undergarment -- my apologies) was knit in Tess' Designer Yarns Linguini (the same yarn I used for Aurelia), which had been staring at me from my stash basket for quite some time. I like the drapiness of the silk in this top, but I really like how the Valley Yarns Goshen gives it more structure, especially the collar and sleeves.

 

Final Version

 

The finished version is a couple of inches larger than the prototype and you can see how it looks with a little bit of ease on me, above.  I didn't change anything in the final version, aside from making the sleeve caps just a smidgen longer.
 
 

Cales, in Twist

 
Ah, a much better fit. I love how the Twist styling team paired Caeles with this pretty printed skirt. I've been wearing my prototype with jeans and a blazer or white pants (last summer), but really want this outfit now.  (Maybe another trip to Anthropologie is in the cards?  Can I count it as a business expense if I end up getting another design idea?)
 
If you're thinking about casting on, WEBS is having a Caeles Knitalong over on their blog! You can read more about it here and pick up a copy of the pattern here. And even better, you can get Goshen on sale for $2.97 a skein (!!) right now here.

Introducing:Twist Style Fridays

Every Friday we feature one of the garments from the magazine in a post about styling. We suggest different ways to wear the garment in question using mock-ups from Polyvore. We encourage readers to tell us what they think about these outfits via our Facebook page or Twitter, and if folks want to make their own outfits, please tweet them at us with the hashtag #twiststyle. You can find all of the Style Friday posts here.

 


 

 

Hello knitters,

Carly here- bloglady and (self proclaimed) style maven. Kate and I have been talking about bringing more fashion-based fun to this here blog, and so we would like to introduce you to a new feature- Twist Style Fridays! Each week, we will bring you a post about taking these lovely patterns off your blocking boards, out of your moth-proof closets, off of your dress forms, and out into the world- you know, like clothes. We may talk about outfits, accessories, shoes (my vice), colors, and so much more.

The last time I wrote about styling, I encouraged you all to play with Polyvore (an online styling tool/playground), and tweet your creations (#twiststyle)! I am reiterating that request now. We want to see your ideas!! Starting with, Amanda Keep's lovely ruffled cardigan, Edgehill.

 

Edgehill

 

My idea for wearing this one isn't wildly different from the one above- still casual and girly. But I think a skirt with a little more pouf would really bring out that lovely arched hemline, and echo the volume of the ruffles.

 

Summer Casual

 

So, how would you wear your Edgehill?

Spring Summer 2012 Images for Styling

Ceylon

Ceylon

Flagstone

Flagstone

Paisley

Paisley

Harrow

Harrow

Marnie

Marnie

Lanata

Lanata

Edgehill

Edgehill


Regent

Regent


Regent

Regent


Nyame

Nyame


Laresca

Laresca


Twill

Twill


Sylvatica

Sylvatica

CaelesCaelesCaeles
CaelesCaeles


Caeles


Brookline

Elizabeth McCartenIn today's post, Elizabeth McCarten shares the evolution of her newest Twist design, Brookline. A favorite garment, an old jean jacket, and a teenage daughter all play important roles in the creation of this elegant cardigan. Keep up with her on her blog, from which this post is borrowed.




Brookline front

It started with a trip to the sheep and wool festival at Rhinebeck in October, 2010. Janie H. and I drove down together and while we were there, Janie discovered Helen Hamann's yarns and designs. She must have tried on every garment in Helen's booth, looking fabulous in all of them as only Janie can, and before the day was out she'd made arrangements for Helen to do a trunk show at her shop in Perth, ON. On our last afternoon in Rhinebeck, when our woolly shopping was wrapped up, Janie and I did a little more shopping in the village. We visited Haldora, where once again, Janie tried on numerous garments and looked smashing in all of them. At a nearby, less pricey shop I bought a mohair blend wrap-style cardigan, knitted at a loose gauge with long ties.

In the end, I only wore that little cardigan once. I found the ties annoying because they forced me to wear the cardigan closed. Nevertheless, I loved everything else about the piece and in the back of my mind thought that sometime I might make myself something similar.
Fast forward to early December when I drove north through the Rideau Lakes to Perth to catch Helen Hamann's trunk show. Her designs weren't really my style, but I loved her alpaca yarns, especially the undyed colours, and I was intrigued by Helen's suggestion that I should try knitting her superfine Luxury yarn at a looser gauge than the ball band suggested. It wasn't until late winter, though, that I got around to thinking that the beautiful grey alpaca I'd purchased would be perfect for a useful little wrap cardigan with buttons instead of ties.

Perth Cardigan

Thus, the Perth Cardi was born. This has been my go-to sweater for the last year. I wear it open with the fronts dangling, I wear it closed, I wear it with blue jeans and with dresses, I wear it layered under a heavier jacket in winter, or as a light coverup on cool summer evenings by Lake Ontario. Then, last summer, I bought some more of Helen's Luxury in a colour labelled "Raspberry Glaze", intending to make a Perth Cardi for Isabel, my then 19-year-old. If I loved the Cardi, shouldn't she? Apparently not. After some discussion and ensuing reflection, I decided to try a variation of the Cardi that would fit into the same number of stitches, and I thought maybe I'd do a higher V-neck, not a wrap. A few inches of knitting later, I realized that the garment I was knitting had a completely different feel. It was a little dressier, a little more fun, and even though Isabel, a computer science major, isn't the 'girly-girl' sort, her new cardigan was going to have ruffles.

Gore St Cardigan

The Perth Cardi was transformed into what at the time I called the "Gore Street Cardigan", so named because of the design's early 19th-century feel, just like the street of the same name here in historic Kingston, ON, and appropriate given the deep gores in the cardigan's body. Isabel donned her new cardigan, we pinned up her hair, and despite the high heat and humidity, we managed some photos.

Gore St

Fabic detail

The buttons you see here were some ancient Rowan ones from my button box; the little stars echoed the knot motif perfectly. I had only enough for three pairs, but Isabel is small, so they worked. These were the photos which were sent as part of my submission to Twist.

Buttons

After the submission was accepted, Kate asked how I would feel about doing the magazine sample in The Fibre Company's "Road to China Light". Who wouldn't be delighted to work with an alpaca/silk/cashmere/camel blend? The result, before I sent it off for professional photography is here:

Finished Brookline

In this case, the buttons were salvaged from an old jean jacket originally purchased from a J. Jill in the Washington, DC area when we lived there. Twist decided to re-name the design "Brookline".

Now, finally, I'm getting around to knitting a version for myself in SandnesGarn's Lanett from my stash in a soft, neutral blue-grey.

a new, blue version

Here, the top portion of the fabric looks smoother than the bottom due to blocking. I'm a big fan of putting all the stitches of a work-in-progress on a length of yarn and wet-blocking to check for gauge and fit. Since I'm only 5' 1", I've also shortened the raglans on this size 38". (I've previously blogged about how to do this in connection with my design, Sandridge, in case you're interested.) This was the state the sweater was in two weeks before the Toronto Knit Frolic, the debut of this version of Brookline- don't worry, I finished it in time!

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